Ischemic Colitis

Ischemic Colitis

0
0
17797 days ago, 358 views

Vascular Disease

Ischemic colitis occurs when blood flow to part of the large intestine (colon) is reduced, usually due to narrowed or blocked blood vessels (arteries). The diminished blood flow doesn't provide enough oxygen for the cells in your digestive system. Ischemic colitis can cause pain and may damage your colon. Any part of the colon can be affected, but ischemic colitis usually causes pain on the left side of the belly area (abdomen). The condition can be misdiagnosed because it can easily be confused with other digestive problems. Ischemic colitis may heal on its own. But you may need medication to treat ischemic colitis or prevent infection, or you may need surgery if your colon has been damaged. Symptoms ShareTweet Oct. 13, 2015 References Products and Services Newsletter: Mayo Clinic Health Letter See also Abdominal pain Colonoscopy Color Blue Detects Colon Cancer CT scan CT scans: Are they safe? Diarrhea Ultrasound Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Advertising & Sponsorship PolicyOpportunitiesAd Choices Mayo Clinic Store Check out these best-sellers and special offers on books and newsletters from Mayo Clinic. NEW! – The Mayo Clinic Diet, Second Edition Treatment Strategies for Arthritis Mayo Clinic on Better Hearing and Balance Keeping your bones healthy and strong The Mayo Clinic Diet Online Ads by Swoop Psoriasis Treatment www.informationaboutpsoriasis.com Explore a Treatment Option for Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis Immune Biomarker PD-L1 - Discover the Science iobiomarkers.bmsinformation.com Understanding Assay Results for PD-L1 is Crucial for Treatment Decisions. Biomarker PD-L1 Information - Easy to Download Resources iobiomarkers.bmsinformation.com Explore the Role of PD-L1 in Immuno-Oncology & the Evolving Biomarker Landscape.

1000 chars left
No comments found.